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Saturday, March 19
 

7:30am

Breakfast and Registration
Saturday March 19, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am
President's Hall

8:30am

Opening Remarks
Saturday March 19, 2016 8:30am - 8:45am
President's Hall

8:45am

Morning Keynote: Dr. Nicholas Jones
Dr. Nicholas Jones began serving as Penn State’s executive vice president and provost in July 2013. As provost, he is the University’s chief academic officer, responsible for the administration of all of Penn State’s research and educational programs, and for the general academic welfare of the faculty and students. In his role as executive vice president, he serves as the chief executive officer in the President’s absence, and he is centrally involved in most University operations.

Speakers

Saturday March 19, 2016 8:45am - 9:45am
President's Hall

9:45am

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 19, 2016 9:45am - 10:00am
TBA

10:00am

Automatic Knowledge Structure Measure in Online Courses
Existing automatic writing evaluation (AWE) tools are typically used for summative purposes (i.e., scoring), based on linguistic assessment and/or implemented in the English language. However, our ALA-Reader system will be implemented in online courses as a formative structural AWE tool applicable to any language. The ALA-Reader immediately converts online students' writings into network graphs to reveal their content knowledge structure (KS) derived from writing assignments. If fully implemented in online courses, then online learners will be provided with visual KS feedback of their writings and also an instructor's KS network graph to indicate specific areas of their current knowledge strengths and weaknesses, regardless of which language is used. Roy Clariana, professor of education, will provide an overview of the ALA-Reader system and his research. Kyung Kim, doctoral student in the Learning, Design, and Technology program and principal investigator on the COIL-funded project "Exploratory Development of a Tool to Measure Learners' Knowledge Structure in Online Learning Courses," will describe the COIL project using the ALA-Reader system. JooYoung Seo, an instructional developer for accessibility in TLT and a master's student in the Learning, Design, and Technology program, will explain how online students with visual impairments are enabled to independently interact with the KS graphs using tablet-based haptic technology and paper-based tactile technology.


Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 104

10:00am

Navigating a Sea of Information
The session will begin with a short overview of the new interface for the Adaptive Map digital textbook project. The Adaptive Map draws upon educational literature, and uses an interactive concept map-based interface to allow users to navigate the large number of interrelated topics in the textbook. The concept map that is the backbone of the tool replaces what would be the table of contents in a traditional textbook, but rather than simply imposing a linear order to the topics as one would in a textbook, the concept map is designed to mimic the highly interrelated knowledge structures of an expert in the domain area. Using information visualization techniques, this map is made into an easy-to-follow interface that allows people to navigate the information similar to how they would navigate in tools such as Google Maps. Past research results will be discussed as well as some possible future directions for the project.

Using the presentation of the Adaptive Map tool as a primer, attendees will then be asked to discuss different ways that we can go beyond simply making information available with technology and find ways that technology can be used to present information in an organized way that helps facilitate learning.


Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 205

10:00am

Gamification Techniques: Turning an International Terror Plot into a Classroom Game
The presentation will describe the effective application of a gamification technique in a course that produced a level of engagement and excitement that was greater than normal and far better than anticipated. The presentation will define and identify intrinsic and extrinsic motivators and have the session attendees experience an example of this firsthand through a simple hands-on exercise. The presenter will explain how to use team-based assessments as a scoring mechanism and extrinsic motivator, introduce the technique of "leveling up" like many gaming environments students are accustomed to, and introduce "role-play" as part of a course project. Ultimately, the gamification technique that will be reviewed is easy to implement for any course in any discipline. To put the gamification technique in the proper context, the presenter will explain the most recent iteration of the course project involving students who were assigned to project teams known as "FBI Fly Teams" responding as a counterterrorism unit. These teams were required to analyze a large volume of threat intelligence artifacts indicating the formation of a possible terror plot at some location around the world and determine the "plot." This sets the stage for applying a gamification technique, as these teams will compete with one another to determine the terror plot and acquire points to improve their grades. During the presentation, attendees will attempt to "find the hidden Lion" on the slides and keep a running total that will be shared at the end, with a prize awarded.

Speakers

Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 105

10:00am

Sparking Student Interest Using Yammer and VoiceThread
Yammer and VoiceThread are effective in engaging students. The presenter has used these technologies in her Penn State course to allow students to be active participants in the learning process. Student retention in learning by passive methods is only 5 percent for lecture, 10 percent for reading, 20 percent for audiovisual, and 30 percent for demonstrations. However, for participatory methods, the retention increases to 50 percent for group discussion, 75 percent by doing, and 90 percent for teaching others. Students participating in a lesson with Yammer and VoiceThread increases retention. Also, students improve their written and oral communication skills while using these technological tools. As an instructor, you can use these tools to spark student interest in your course by creating a community of inquiry and allowing students to explore relevant current discoveries in the field. In this hands-on workshop, you will actively learn by doing. You will set up and use your own Yammer network and VoiceThread, within a small group. Also, you will learn simple guidelines to get students to participate and to manage assessment. Later, you can use this knowledge to try out in your own course.

Speakers
avatar for Dana Brinkel

Dana Brinkel

Research Technologist, Chemistry, Penn State Altoona


Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 106

10:00am

Getting Started with LTIs in Canvas
Whether you are creating a cool new learning tool or solving an administrative problem, using Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI) creates a seamless experience for your users and can be used in any learning management system (LMS). LTI is a standard created by the IMS Global Learning Consortium. Its primary purpose is to connect learning systems such as an LMS with external service tools in a standard way across systems. Come to see examples of Penn State-created LTIs and why they are being used. After showing the structure of an LTI, including how to authorize a user and the types of LMS data that can be retrieved, the presenters will provide resources to get participants started on their own LTIs.

Instructions for submission will be provided to help individuals navigate the waters of server scans, Penn State policy, and FERPA restricted data policies. Finally, attendees will be shown how to gain access to their LTI in Canvas when the approval process is complete.


Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 108

10:00am

Maximizing Canvas in Residential Courses
Canvas has unique tools to help in the resident instruction (RI) classroom. Information Sciences and Technology faculty and learning designers have been testing out the use of these tools and will share insight on their experiences. This discussion will include self-assigned teams, calendar scheduler, synchronous discussions, attendance manager, and more.

Learn how one instructor was able to hold synchronous discussions in Canvas during the time the class would meet, when she needed to unexpectedly travel out of town. Another instructor found the attendance manager a useful tool to keep track of attendance in the RI classroom by connecting it to the gradebook for class. Meanwhile, a third instructor set up teams on different topics and allowed the students to self-select which topics they wanted to work on.

Each of these experiences offer an opportunity to discover new affordances in the Canvas learning management system and how they can be leveraged in resident instruction. Join us in this discussion to explore more of these ideas and what growing pains the presenters ran into along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Garbrick

Amy Garbrick

Director, IST Learning Design, Learning Design, College of IST, PSU
Director of Learning Design & Instructor, College of IST



Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 206

10:00am

Using Digital Badges to Verify Skill Competency in a Business Curriculum
This session will present the TLT Fellow project on digital badges in the Bachelor of Science in Business (BSBIC) program with Veronica Godshalk. The presenters will introduce this project and include the design and redesign of the assignments and the course. They will also introduce badges verifying skill competencies in a course and the initial findings on how badges can improve learner motivation.


Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 208

10:00am

Redesigning Online Presentation Spaces: An Example of Pedagogy Driving Technology
Reproducing the art studio experience online was said to be impossible. A few years later, the precursor to ELMS LN Studio was created to meet this inherent need for critique and feedback in online arts courses, and has since proven relevant to meeting pedagogical needs in the context of other disciplines, including business and the sciences.

This panel session will briefly describe the background of the impetus for the ELMS Learning Network Studio. The panelists will then discuss how two other colleges, the Eberly College of Science and Smeal College of Business, were able to repurpose the existing features of the Studio to extend the critique experience into other disciplines. Panelists will also discuss how the expansion to science and business has influenced the experience for arts.

This session is for anyone interested in learning more about critique as a cross-disciplinary assessment strategy, and how to use online spaces to encourage effective critique among students. Additionally, the panelists will identify the key features that allow for more useful critique online.

The first part of the session will be a short presentation, followed by a Q&A revolving around how critique can be applied in other disciplines, features of the tool that would work for specific use cases, and other teaching and learning strategies outside of critique that could benefit from the "pedagogy-first" approach of designing a technology tool that really fits the instructional need rather than adjusting an activity to make it fit what the available technology allows.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Hicks

Melissa Hicks

Director, Office of Digital Learning, Pennsylvania State University
I'm in charge of the Office of Digital Learning at the Eberly College of Science. I manage the portfolio of World Campus courses, as well as bridge over into digital initiatives in residential instruction. I am about bringing the right people to the table in order to get the job done. I love social networks, bassets, and ELMSLN. Make sure to say "Hi!"
avatar for Bryan Ollendyke

Bryan Ollendyke

ELMS:LN Lead Developer, Penn State
I love talking about Philosophy and its influence on technology and how we can shape society through proper alignment of all three. Educational technology design is the thing I do, my passion is building a better, more open, more transparent, cheaper, faster, better planet through elimination of waste. Information Altruism, the giving away of ideas and information is what changes the world.
avatar for Katrina Wehr

Katrina Wehr

Instructional Designer, Penn State
Talk to me about mobile, instructional design, pedagogy, online learning, online teaching strategies, blended learning and education technology policy!


Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 109

10:00am

Speaking through the Stack Efficiently and Painlessly: Grading via Podcasts
To begin, the presenter will address the vast amount of time instructors spend evaluating student work, calling to mind the formidable "stacks" of submitted assignments and the challenge to provide thoughtful feedback that not only enhances student learning, but also can be offered in a quick turnaround time.

Following this, she will explain how she has transitioned from providing her students with standard written feedback to a new format: spoken feedback via podcasts. While explaining this process, she will highlight podcasting technologies that not only are accessible and ubiquitous, but also can be easily transmitted to students.

To close the session, the presenter will share student feedback that she has culled from the past three semesters across six sections of undergraduate GWS courses to provide evidence that students have found this practice more thorough, more easy to understand, more helpful for retention, and more personalized than the standard written feedback they regularly receive.

Throughout the session, sample podcasts will be provided so participants can understand how feedback can be provided in an efficient yet thorough fashion. Additionally, the presenter will share how the practice of speaking feedback has made the grading process a more pleasant, quicker experience, which is useful for any instructor carrying a full course load.

Speakers

Saturday March 19, 2016 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 204

10:45am

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 19, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
TBA

11:00am

Driving Student Success with OER & Next Generation Digital Courseware

A popular conversation in higher education is about the opportunities provided by open educational resources (OER) and the prospect for educators and students to access open educational learning materials and technologies. Despite OER being a favorite buzzword, the actual adoption of OER courses has been slow. One of the key obstacles in this area is around providing support for instructors and institutions towards designing their OER-based courses, picking the right content, and packaging all of it for superior classroom experience. At Barnes & Noble College, we are developing a program to support our campus partners and the faculty in the effective use or OER courses. This session will highlight some of our ideas/thoughts in this area of growing interest.


Speakers
avatar for Sesha Bolisetty

Sesha Bolisetty

Director, Digital Content, Barnes & Noble Education
I have spent the last 20 plus years of my career focusing on Higher Education Courseware Technologies and Digital Content Management. Within Barnes & Noble Education, my role is focused on developing innovative digital courseware technologies and content platforms.


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 205

11:00am

Engaging Blind Learners in Statistics Study Using R
R is one of the emerging open-source languages—and free software itself—that is primarily designed for data analysis. It provides a wide variety of statistical packages and permits users to easily produce publication-quality visualized graphics. JooYoung Seo, a master's student in the Learning, Design, and Technology program and instructional developer for accessibility at the TLT Studio, will begin with sharing some challenges he has faced in statistics courses as a blind learner. Some statistical software such as SPSS and Minitab will be demonstrated briefly in terms of accessibility limitations.

JooYoung will introduce the R environment as an alternative solution for both instructors and blind learners who have to approach statistical analysis and visualized plots. BrailleR, extrafont, and other useful R packages will be suggested to help blind learners perform and understand statistical analysis as sighted people do.

In a hands-on portion of the session, he will show how the visualized graphics can be transformed into tactile graphs with braille code embedded using R packages in conjunction with a Swell Form Heating Machine.

Instructors, researchers, instructional designers, and blind learners who are involved in or interested in accessible STEM content will benefit from this practical session. Future steps for better and equal access in STEM content will be discussed at the end of the presentation with participants.

Speakers

Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 106

11:00am

Experiments First—Using Technology to Transform an Undergraduate Chemistry Classroom
This session shows how Philip Bevilacqua (an admitted tech novice) learned to leverage technology in a freshman-level honors chemistry course to engage students in a deeper understanding of chemistry and get them excited about applying chemistry to problems in their particular major. The goal was to redesign the course, putting experiments first, which allowed students to grapple with the actual construction of molecular models based on hands-on demos. At the heart of the course, screencasts coupled with real demos/experiments established a visual basis for various phenomena.

The presenters will explain ways to layer information into YouTube videos: real-life demonstrations/experiments with use of zooming and slow-mo, explanations by active sketches of molecules, voice dubbing as needed, and YouTube-level annotations, which can be hidden by the viewer, to provide metacognitive analysis. Learners are guided on several levels and can slow down or pause the presentation to help digest the material. Simpler uses of screencasts, such as "flipping" portions of the class or explaining problem solving techniques, will also be presented and used to show how even complex material can be made accessible to the student. Ways to assure engagement of the student in learning from the screencasts, such as entry into notebooks and involvement in pre-lecture assessments and quizzes, will be discussed.

The presenters will engage in discussion about the journey from exploration to implementation to lessons learned and will help others brainstorm ways they can implement such strategies. If one chemistry instructor can do it, so can you!

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Hicks

Melissa Hicks

Director, Office of Digital Learning, Pennsylvania State University
I'm in charge of the Office of Digital Learning at the Eberly College of Science. I manage the portfolio of World Campus courses, as well as bridge over into digital initiatives in residential instruction. I am about bringing the right people to the table in order to get the job done. I love social networks, bassets, and ELMSLN. Make sure to say "Hi!"


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 105

11:00am

Integration: Making Technology Work for You and Your Students
This session explores the use and integration of various technologies within specific courses. Specifically, methods of integrating iPads, Course Capture, and Box will be highlighted. Marc will share insights from his experiences that can serve as jumping-off points for faculty excited about integrating various technologies into a single course.


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 108

11:00am

Promoting Cultural Competence through Culture Walks
Attendees in this session will learn how to enhance students' cultural competency through the use of web-based virtual culture walks. These culture walks will be highly interactive—pre- and posttests, audio, video, learning objects to manipulate, and embedded questions. Present research that I have been conducting provides evidence of learning from pre-/posttests as well as comments provided by students and teachers alike.

Participants in this session will have an opportunity to experience a number of culture walks and, if interested, will be invited to participate in the creation of more culture walks. A discussion on the benefits of culture walks for development of cultural competency and becoming more globalized citizens will also be incorporated.

Speakers
DG

Deborah Gill

Assoc. Professor of Spanish, Penn State DuBois


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 204

11:00am

Canvas User Experience (UX) Study and Results
As Penn State transitions to Canvas, find out more about how actual students interact with this new learning management system and help inform your Canvas course designs to maximize impact with students. Members of the College of Information Sciences and Technology's learning design group conducted an IRB Canvas UX study using IST World Campus students in a hands-on test. Hear about the IRB study and the UX testing process, see video footage from the testing, and learn more about our Canvas UX testing conclusions and how they may help shape design decisions. Then, find out more about other Canvas UX-related efforts starting to happen around the University.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Garbrick

Amy Garbrick

Director, IST Learning Design, Learning Design, College of IST, PSU
Director of Learning Design & Instructor, College of IST
avatar for Andrea Gregg

Andrea Gregg

Manager of Instructional Design, Penn State
Manager of Instructional Design, World Campus Learning Design. Responsible for leading Online Learning Research Initiative - empirically-based, theoretically-grounded research in online teaching and learning.
avatar for Ronda Reid

Ronda Reid

Instructional Designer, Penn State: College of IST
Instructional Designer, College of IST


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 207

11:00am

2015 Open Innovation Challenge Winner: The Virtual Reality Teaching Simulator
Born from an idea at the 2015 TLT Symposium, "First Class" is a first of its kind teaching simulator which leverages natural human movement, gesture, and voice to create an immersive learning experience for preservice teachers. Join in to hear about the journey from dream to reality and to try out "First Class" for yourself!


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 208

11:00am

3-D Printing for All: Building a Community around Maker Commons
Penn State has an active "maker" community that touches many disciplines—architecture, engineering, materials sciences, and visual arts, to name a few—and spans multiple colleges and campuses. This session will discuss how the Maker Commons is solidifying this community and creating exciting new 3-D printing education and research activities at Penn State and beyond.


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 104

11:00am

Penn State 2021: How Will Technology Shape the Educational Experience?
This session will feature an open discussion related to how technology might reshape various aspects of the Penn State educational experience. Our panelists will share their unique perspectives in this interactive session, painting a picture of what a future Penn State education might look like in the year 2021 and beyond.


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 206

11:00am

Taming Big Data in MOOCs
The rise of massive open online courses (MOOCs) has generated a high volume of learners' data available to higher education institutions. These data have been mainly used by these institutions for analytics purposes, providing essential information about students' engagement, drop-out rates, and different learning preferences. However, dealing with big data prompts questions such as: What are the proper ways to fully understand the complexity and amplitude of these data? How can technology be used as an ally in the process of cleaning and understanding these data for future decisions regarding online teaching and learning? How can data integrity be managed and maintained?

The process of answering these questions reveals challenges imposed by the nature of big data in the context of MOOCs. In this panel, we invite the Penn State community to discuss best practices for taming big data in MOOCs. Attendees will learn about selecting and combining various tools and technologies to process, transform, and analyze data and to communicate effectively as a team. Our panel will present our experiences both from the research and technical perspectives and will include a lively Q&A session. Providing tools and critical considerations to deal with the data will be beneficial for researchers and their teams in providing clean data for accurate insights and prediction models. Outcomes of our panel have the potential to ignite a collaborative work group about best practices in coding and data mining when dealing with big data generated by MOOCs.


Saturday March 19, 2016 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 109

11:45am

Lunch
Saturday March 19, 2016 11:45am - 1:15pm
President's Hall

12:45pm

Open Innovation Challenge
The Open Innovation Challenge offers a high-profile speaking opportunity to present new innovative ideas about anything that enhances teaching and learning in higher education. Select innovators will be given an opportunity to showcase their ideas in a set of fast-paced 5 minute presentations. The audience will have the opportunity to vote on their favorite ideas.

Visit https://challenge.tlt.psu.edu/ to view the Open Innovation Challenge presenters and the ideas they will be discussing.

Saturday March 19, 2016 12:45pm - 1:30pm
President's Hall

1:45pm

Ten Ways Students Cheat without 'Doing Anything Wrong'
Technology has changed the way students approach their studies and faculty approach their classes. Much of this change is for the better and has connected students and faculty in ways that support learning. Technological innovations such as clickers have enabled faculty to get real-time feedback and the Internet provides students with access to volumes of information that was previously inaccessible. But technology has also created new opportunities for students to make choices that undermine their learning without realizing it, such as texting friends for an answer to a homework problem or a student using two clickers in class to cover for a friend's absence. It has also enabled students to get immediate access to a wealth of past assignments (and answers to those assignments) that was previously only a perk passed down from fraternity members or older siblings.

We are also seeing the rise of commercial online tutoring sites such as Chegg that claim to act as a 24/7 support system, but have also become a back door for students to access someone else's answers to questions they are expected to generate themselves.

In this session, panel members including students, faculty, and administrators from across the University will discuss the trends they are seeing with misuse of technology. More importantly, they will share steps some are taking across the University to not only deter inappropriate behavior, but to open dialogue with their students about how to make better, more ethical decisions in their college classes and in life as well.

Speakers
CM

Christine Masters

Assistant Dean for Academic Support and Global Programs, Penn State University


Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 206

1:45pm

Undergraduate Research Published in E-Books: (Re)Writing Local Histories
The presenters will discuss their work on creating platforms for students in Laurie's courses to author and construct e-books on local history projects in a single semester, for publication online. The technology specialists will report on the challenges and strategies they faced in constructing the platform; Laurie will discuss how she modified her pedagogy to add e-book construction to the curriculum.


Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 109

1:45pm

Demonstrating Effective Uses of Canvas: Two Micro-Sessions
Increasing Online Student Engagement and Teaching Presence in Canvas, Tony Anderson

In this session, the presenter will discuss the current state of student engagement/interaction and teaching presence in the learning management system and discuss ways that they can be increased and better utilized using the Canvas media tool. 

Increasing Student Success with Canvas, Daonian Liu

Many undergraduate students need help in developing time management and online communication skills to succeed in a blended learning environment. Canvas makes it easier to design a hybrid course that allows the learners to see quickly where they are in the learning process and what they need to do to stay focused and on track. With the Canvas analytics tools, the instructor can see student activities and learning progress at a quick glance to identify at-risk students as well as those who are well ahead of the class. Liu will demonstrate how she facilitates student success in her hybrid course by providing a simple Canvas course interface as well as a multifaceted communication mechanism. She will share how she regularly acts upon the course analytical data, reaches out to the at-risk students with caring and empowering help, and revises teaching strategies to lower student anxiety while upholding high expectation of learning outcomes.

Speakers
TA

Tony Anderson

Canvas LMS Project Manager
DL

Daonian Liu

Director, Center for Learning and Teaching, Penn State Berks


Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 207

1:45pm

Hacking Canvas: Making the Rubric Tool Work for You
Rubrics are used for numerous purposes in higher education including helping students self-assess their own work, accommodating peer review of student work, and performing both formative and summative assessments for papers, projects, and other assignments. In most academic circles when rubrics are discussed, two types of rubrics emerge, analytic and holistic rubrics. While these two rubrics are the most common, we have identified four distinctly different types of rubrics that we will share examples of as we briefly discuss the pros and cons, use cases, and best practices for using each one. Many instructional designers and faculty have used the rubric tool in ANGEL for one or more of the purposes outlined above for years and have come to rely on them for grading. As almost everyone in the Penn State community knows by now, ANGEL is being replaced with Canvas as Penn State's official learning management system by the end of 2017. The two systems are very different from one another, but the good news is that Canvas also has an easy-to-use rubric tool that makes grading more consistent, faster, and all around easier. The highlight of this session will be learning how to develop each of the four different types of rubrics using the rubric tool available in Canvas.


Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 106

1:45pm

Disaster Preparedness for Senior Undergraduate Nursing Students
Attendees will learn how nursing students enhance their understanding of disaster preparedness through simulation. The presentation will engage the attendees in the overall simulation and the debriefing portion of the exercise. Following the presentation will be time for discussion.

Speakers

Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 105

1:45pm

Taking the Lab out of the Lab Room
If you are a student in the arts, you use your tools outside of the classroom to practice and explore at your own pace. Many STEM classes also have hands-on components, but we usually restrict students' exploration to time and place limited environments. Driven by the needs of online educators, innovative tools have emerged that allow students to do hands-on activities outside of the lab room.

In this session, the presenter will discuss with the audience the goals of introductory science labs and determine what can be moved out of the lab room. Attendees will brainstorm on topics including the pedagogical benefits, scalability, safety, liability, cost, and technology.

To frame the discussion, the presenter will describe recent efforts in physics with a new multipurpose instrument (IOLab). This versatile device is an analog of a set of paintbrushes. It is portable and relatively inexpensive, and it facilitates an integration of hands-on activities with the lectures.

The use of the IOLab in PHYS 211/212 for physics majors is currently being piloted. Preliminary results will be presented of their study that uses interviews, in-class recordings, and attitudinal and conceptual surveys.

This session will be of interest for online or face-to-face instructors. By taking the lab out of the lab room, we enable curiosity, imagination, real-world applications, and just plain fun!

Speakers
avatar for Louis Leblond

Louis Leblond

Lecturer, Online Education specialist, Penn state, University Park, Physics department
Physics lecturer interested in education research and online education. I teach large enrollment intro physics courses regularly and work to improve them. I am interested in creating innovative online courses and online tool to enrich face to face classes. Currently working on developing hands-on lab for future physics online courses.


Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 204

1:45pm

Wearable Technology for Self-Regulated Learning
Wearable technology has erupted over the last year and is impacting everything from fitness tracking to text messaging. These personal devices provide instant notifications and personal insights about our health, our work, and our schedule. What insights would we gain with a wearable device for learning? This session will discuss a TLT Faculty Fellow project that helps to answer this question. Nudge is an app for the Apple Watch that prompts students about their coursework directly on their wrist. Designed and developed with TLT, Nudge will offer critical data and insights to Sperling and her team regarding self-regulated learning.

Speakers
avatar for Rayne Sperling

Rayne Sperling

Educational Psychology
I study scaffolds to support students' metacognition, learning, and engagement.


Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 208

1:45pm

What is the Penn State EdTech Network and How Can I Participate?
The President announced Invent Penn State last year as a University-wide initiative to advance our University as a hub for economic development and entrepreneurship. The University created the Penn State EdTech Network to advance the emerging educational technology sector among the Penn State community. Join this session to learn more about the network's strategy, status, and opportunities for you to participate.


Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 108

1:45pm

Assessing Learning Outcomes: SALG to the Rescue!
Do you use new technologies in your classroom and/or make changes in your teaching to improve student learning? If so, how do you know these changes are impacting student learning, beyond course grades and SRTEs? Eileen Grodziak, instructional design specialist at Penn State Lehigh Valley, and Vicki Williams, manager of assessment in TLT, will introduce the customizable Student Assessment of Learning Gains (SALG) instrument that is useful for individual course and program assessment. From responses to verified survey questions, instructors discover which aspects of the course best support student learning, and which aspects may need improvement. Karen Kackley-Dutt, instructor of biology, and Sandy Kile, instructor of communication arts and sciences, will describe how they use the SALG to assess students' perceptions of their learning gains after using new technologies and engaging with a variety of course elements. They will also explain how the SALG is being used as part of a broader research initiative in their discipline. The highly customizable instrument lends itself to applications across disciplines. The remaining half of the session will be exploration and conversations about how the use of the instrument may be applied in participants' contexts.


Saturday March 19, 2016 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 104

2:30pm

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 19, 2016 2:30pm - 2:45pm
TBA

2:45pm

Accessibility: Burden, Benefit, or Breakthrough? Key Principles for Inclusive Educational Design
When we think about all that goes into mastering good design principles, it is no wonder that tackling accessibility can appear to be a daunting, unrealistic burden. This session will cover accessibility basics including defining disability and the key attributes of inclusive design. It will then provide three separate pathways to planning and building one online learning project.

Topics will include: 1) Defining disability: Who has the right to define what disability is?; 2) Key principles for inclusive design; 3) A case study: www.musicedseries.org.

Speakers
avatar for Sonya Woods

Sonya Woods

Accessibility Consultant, World Campus Learning Design
I do accessibility consulting, training, research, evaluation, and documentation in the context on online higher ed and am an advocate for universal design for learning.


Saturday March 19, 2016 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 106

2:45pm

Open Educational Resources at Penn State
President Barron has made access and affordability a priority for his presidency at Penn State. One of the many costs that has noticeably increased for students over the years is that of course textbooks. On average, students at four-year universities spent $1,224 on books and supplies during AY 2014-2015. The increase in textbook costs has far outpaced both general inflation and tuition increases (Popken, 2015). During this session, pilot team members will discuss what is currently happening to address this issue with the Penn State Open Educational Resource (OER) pilot charged by Provost Jones in February 2015 to explore ways to systematically implement OERs to support Penn State teaching and learning. We will discuss the survey results from the fall 2015 pilot, methods for transitioning to OER, available resources at Penn State, and best practices and tips from a faculty member who has implemented OER into his teaching.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Gregg

Andrea Gregg

Manager of Instructional Design, Penn State
Manager of Instructional Design, World Campus Learning Design. Responsible for leading Online Learning Research Initiative - empirically-based, theoretically-grounded research in online teaching and learning.
avatar for Julie Lang

Julie Lang

Instructional Designer, TLT


Saturday March 19, 2016 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 206

2:45pm

Active Learning across Disciplines: Faculty/Student Perspectives on Blended Design
This session will present the perspectives of an instructional designer, two faculty, and two students who are part of the Penn State New Kensington's Blended Learning Initiative. This initiative is in its second year and encourages small cohorts of faculty and instructional designers to support each other during the blended design process.
Attendees will hear what worked well, what did not work as planned, and why. Specifically, an instructional designer will describe the Blended Learning Initiative, while faculty will share their active learning assignments and students will discuss how the assignment improved their learning experience. We will also share assessment data that supports the increase in students' learning.


Saturday March 19, 2016 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 108

2:45pm

Engaging Students in Large-Enrollment Courses
Engaging students in large, 250+ enrollment courses can be a significant challenge. Some of our instructors and departments face this challenge every semester, and have developed unique strategies to keep students engaged. This panel will offer attendees the chance to hear, and interact, with three instructors who have years of experience teaching large lecture courses.

Speakers
avatar for Louis Leblond

Louis Leblond

Lecturer, Online Education specialist, Penn state, University Park, Physics department
Physics lecturer interested in education research and online education. I teach large enrollment intro physics courses regularly and work to improve them. I am interested in creating innovative online courses and online tool to enrich face to face classes. Currently working on developing hands-on lab for future physics online courses.


Saturday March 19, 2016 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 109

2:45pm

Using Emerging Technologies to Innovate Blue Band Performances
The presenters will explain how the Blue Band uses tablets on the practice and performance fields and discuss the applications the Blue Band uses to train and track band members. A video will show how use of the tablets was implemented, from setup to teaching on-site.

Volunteers will be selected from the audience to be honorary Blue Band members who will be placed into a formation and then march with instruments. Their "performance" will be recorded, and the video footage will then be reviewed using an application and the volunteers will be told how to improve their marching. This interaction will be fun and upbeat while giving some insight into how the Blue Band operates.

Finally, IT professionals and Blue Band student leaders will answer questions that may have been sparked by the video and demonstration.


Saturday March 19, 2016 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 207

2:45pm

Using Conferences in Canvas
Instructor presence and student engagement are important for any course, especially courses which are taught online. This session is for those who would like to know more about Conferences in Canvas and how they can improve instructor presence and student engagement. The presenters will talk about how they used Big Blue Button in their online classes. Gary will discuss how he uses Big Blue Button to talk about labs for his course to provide instruction and feedback. Rosalie will discuss how she gets nearly 80 percent participation in live sessions for her course on enterprise architecture. Amy will discuss how group facilitation can be improved using Big Blue Button. Ravi will talk about office hours and student motivation using Big Blue Button for an online math course. Join this session to find a winning strategy to improve your course.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Garbrick

Amy Garbrick

Director, IST Learning Design, Learning Design, College of IST, PSU
Director of Learning Design & Instructor, College of IST



Saturday March 19, 2016 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 105

2:45pm

Multisensory Inputs in Immersive Virtual Reality Applications
Technological advancements in mobile computing are bridging the sensory gap between virtual environments and brick and mortar environments. This session explores the impact of multisensory inputs (i.e., sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch) on the immersive virtual reality experience.


Saturday March 19, 2016 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 208

2:45pm

Integrating iPads into Computer Science and IST Classes
This session will discuss the use of iPads in computer science and IST courses during 2015-2016. The use of iPads for computer programming and other activities was part of a gradual attempt to change these courses from an instructor-driven model to a student-driven model. It was thought that this technology would allow students to be more engaged with the material, more mobile in the classroom, and to more effectively utilize existing collaborative spaces. iPad-driven activities (e.g., flowchart creation with LucidChart, visualization with Codea Scratchpad) were designed to help students build problem-solving skills while providing them opportunities for collaborative learning. Apple TV was another tool used to allow students to share their work in real time with other members of their team as well as the entire class.

This session will describe the individual and collaborative activities students performed, the apps utilized, management challenges, and the lessons learned from integrating iPads into these courses. The session will also discuss the available student feedback and its impact on future integration into these courses. While some positive results and feedback were observed, the integration of iPads provided a number of important lessons on how iPads can be effectively leveraged.

Speakers

Saturday March 19, 2016 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 104

3:30pm

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 19, 2016 3:30pm - 3:45pm
TBA

3:45pm

3:55pm

Afternoon Keynote: Dr. Mimi Ito

Dr. Mimi Ito is known internationally for her expertise on how people use mobile technologies and new digital media in their everyday lives. She is research Director of the Digital Media and Learning Hub, and chair of the Connected Learning Research Network, both part of the MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning initiative that investigates how today’s digital and networked media can be mobilized for the longstanding goals of progressive education. She co-led the Digital Youth Project, a landmark study of the ways young people use new media as part of the initiative, and is co-author of the book based on the study: Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media.

Her newest book is Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics with coauthors and previous TLT Symposium keynote speakers danah boyd and Henry Jenkins. She is also John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning, and a professor-in-residence, Department of Anthropology and Department of Informatics, at the University of California, Irvine. She has two doctorates from Stanford University, one in education and one in anthropology.



Speakers

Saturday March 19, 2016 3:55pm - 4:45pm
President's Hall